Motherhood (series)

Infancy; New Mum

It was a whole new phase, this Motherhood thing. Before I got pregnant, I was well aware of what NF2 can do to my baby. There is a 50/50 percent chance of me passing the genes with NF2 to my child. I don’t want that but I wanted an offspring, a child to call my own.

I had two miscarriages prior to my third successful one so when I knew I was pregnant the third time, I was a little apprehensive. A sense of relief overcame my fears when my pregnancy passed the 1st trimester mark.

But nothing can subside the anxiety I felt knowing I won’t be able to hear him cry. I prepared myself and even bought a set of baby monitor that has vibrating function which I never get use at all. I was really torn between wanting to embrace this new life and just wing it; whatever hurdle that’s coming my way. Some time during my last trimester, my balance went awry. With my increasing belly weight, it got the better of me. I stumbled and fall on my knees. Thankfully, nothing serious took place. I just had a really bad shock.

A week before my EDD, my waterbag broke. But I hadn’t felt any contractions. Despite that, my mum and husband insisted I checked into the hospital. Upon arriving, I felt on and off mini contractions. It went away for the night and I was able to sleep. I was induced the next morning. I couldn’t remember the time I went into labour except that it was early morning. The pain got unbearable around late morning so I got the nurse to give me the laughing gas. I finally gave birth in the afternoon. With a SG50 baby, I welcomed motherhood.

The first few weeks were stressful for me. I couldn’t breastfeed well and my son would cry so much. My husband would nudged me awake when my son needed attention. Each time he cried, only my mum was able to comfort him so he spent his bedtime mostly with my mum until now.

I managed to bath him, changed his diapers and played with him during my confinement. I was still working so I had to go back to work once my maternity leave ended. Being a new mum was not easy. On top of that, I’m not able to hear him. But they say, mothers have strong instincts toward their child. I have to agree because every time I napped beside him, I would be jolted awake when he cried. I’d be surprised that he was actually crying because I did not hear him. It was like I instinctively woke up to attend to him. ❤️

The experience was amazing and a learning curve for me. No disability can stop a woman from being a mother. 👩‍👦

October 30th, 2017|A Story For Her|0 Comments
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